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The New Flint Grill and Bar

EDG Interior Architecture and Design serves up a sleek and homey dining environment for patrons visiting the recently-revamped Flint Grill and Bar at the JW Marriott in Hong Kong writes Christie Lee.

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BY Janice Seow

October 17th, 2014


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The recently-renovated Flint Grill and Bar at the JW Marriott in Hong Kong has enlisted the expertise of Singapore-based EDG Interior Architecture and Design, who has managed to deliver an interior that is intimate and homey, without passing up any of the sophistication that characterises a top-notch fine dining establishment.

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Flint Grill and Bar accommodates a hundred people and is composed of a series of spaces, including a private dining room, two dining suites, bar area and a lounge. Dark timber combine with patina for an uptown-meets-industrial aesthetic, with the mix of upholstered leather chairs and sleek sofas lending a homey feel.

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The stellar spirits collection is displayed to best effect atop minimalist dark wood shelves at the bar, while a long bartop is installed at the front for mixologists to work their flair. The dining out experience is further enhanced by the open kitchen, which appears to be a trend that’s been sweeping across Hong Kong in the last year or so.

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EDG’s trademark attention to detail is evidenced by the locally sourced antiques and custom furniture – vintage scales, figurines and the like – which imbues the restaurant with a sense of place without appearing forced. Provided by Tino Kwan Lighting, the fanciful pendant lighting injects vibrancy into the space.

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The wallpaper, which from afar looks like elongated coloured barcodes, is actually the work of acclaimed Hong Kong photographer Michael Wolf. Wolf had abstracted his photos of Hong Kong high-rises to an extent that they manifest themselves in blurry stripes rather than as buildings.

Photography by Owen Raggett

EDG Interior Architecture and Design
edgdesign.com